Energy Efficiency

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By providing an energy-efficient home you are likely to provide a more attractive property to prospective tenants and you will comply with your existing legal requirements.

As part of their carbon reduction strategy, the Government has also indicated that they are likely to look at future, more stringent requirements to improve the energy efficiency so it is a good idea to start adjusting your properties now.

Energy performance certificates (EPC)

Energy Performance Certificates (EPC)

Last Updated: 28/07/2020

Energy Performance Certificates were introduced in England and Wales in 2007. These certificates rate a property's energy efficiency on a scale of A-G. You are required to have one if you plan to market a property for sale or let in most circumstances.

Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards (MEES)

Minimum Energy Efficiency (MEES)

Last Updated: 22/07/2020

Since April 2018, the Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards have made it a legal requirement for all privately owned properties to have an EPC rating of at least an 'E' before they are sold or let. As of April 2020, this requirement has now been extended to tenancies that existed prior to April 2018.

EPCs and MEES for listed buildings

Last Updated: 03/08/2020

If a property does not require an EPC then it does not have to comply with the Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards. For listed buildings and those in conservation areas, this exemption status is crucial, as many of these properties will be incapable of reaching that level due to the nature of the building. Unfortunately, not all listed buildings will be exempt from the requirements.

Double glazing requirements

Double glazing requirements

Last Updated: 22/09/2020

In April 2002 the Government introduced legislation designed to conserve heat loss in private houses. They require all windows and doors in newly built houses; and complete replacement windows and doors in old housing stock to be double-glazed using a low emissivity glass.