Decorating a property during the tenancy
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7 Posts
12 years ago
2
Hi all,

I have a tenant who has been in one of my apartments for just under 2 years. They have contacted me regarding decorating the living room of the property. The apartment is under 3 years old and they have requested that I pay for the materials to paint the living room.

The tenant has quoted the landlord and tenants act, stating

Decorating

The tenant would not normally be required to re-decorate the property at the end of the tenancy unless stated in the agreement. If the property’s interior decoration had been damaged the tenant may be required to re-decorate the property, or the landlord may retain some of the deposit to cover re-decoration costs.

If a tenant did want to re-decorate the property they should always seek the landlord's permission first and find out what changes they are entitled to make.

If the property is in need of decoration as a result of normal use and wear and tear then the landlord is responsible for re-decorating and should not retain any of the tenant’s deposit.

But to me that deals with decoration at the end of tenancy and the with holding of deposit to pay for general wear and tear of the property.

To me the section that the tenant should be reading is the following

The landlord is not required to repair any interior problems such as internal plaster, internal doors or skirting boards, unless these are affected as a result of the exterior of the property not being in a good repair. In these circumstances the landlord would be required to ensure these aspects were restored to good working order, had they been affected by the poor exterior of the property.

Now I know someone is going to jump in and say why not just pay for it and keep a happy tenant, but this tenant has been a problem tenant from the start.

So am I right in saying the decorating of the property during the tenancy like this is not my repsonibility?

Thanks in advance


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